Weeds and the Huon Valley

Weed Definition

The definition of weed is simply a plant that is growing where it is not wanted.  For instance, grass is valued as part of a lawn, but viewed as a weed in a vegetable garden.  Environmental weeds are non-native plants that invade bushland and threaten the native plants through competing for resources.  Declared weeds are plants listed in the Weed Management Act 1999 as plants that have potential adverse impact in Tasmania.


Reporting a Weed

If you think you have seen one of these weeds Please take two photographs, one of the entire plant and one close up of the leaves and flowers, and don’t forget to note the location and then send the information to NRM Unit for us to confirm identification and action eradication measure if appropriate.

Biosecurity Reminder

Arrive at your destination with clean vehicles and clean, healthy stock. Review the activities you have in place to protect your farm from weeds, pests and diseases. Biosecurity activities protect farm productivity, in turn protecting farm profitability and the industry as a whole. Consider the risks to your property and plan to reduce them through biosecurity measures. For more information: NRM South’s Farm Biosecurity Guide

Be prepared – put these phone numbers in your phone now:
Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline 1800 675 888
Exotic Plant Pest Hotline 1800 084 881.

How can you better manage weeds on your property?

While Council does conduct and coordinate weed control programs on public land from time to time, land-owners are also encouraged to take responsibility for the control of weeds on their own property and adjoining roadside.

If you are interested in controlling weeds without using herbicides consider using steam or boiling water methods.  These documents have been developed to assist you in developing your own weed management plan unique to your property:

Example property weed management plan

Blank template for weed management plan

Further information on how to identify and control weeds:

Weed Identification Guide for the Huon Valley

DPIPWE Index of Declared Weeds

Weeds of National Significance

Southern Tasmanian Weed Strategy Downloads

A public Facebook group “Tasmanian Weeds

DPIPWE Weed and Disease Planning and Hygiene Guidelines

How can you dispose of weeds safely?

At this stage none of the Waste Transfer Stations in the Huon Valley accept declared weeds.

The options available to you all involve the use of heat to kill any viable weed seeds:

  • Place weed material in double rubbish bags with a splash of water and leave in the sun for a period of at least 3 months before disposing of in the general waste.
  • Incinerate in an enclosed (to contain seed material and increase heat) incinerator or drum.
  • Hot compost to 60oC+ before using composted materials.

How does the Council manage declared weeds?

Below are the Huon Valley’s priority weeds listed under the category associated with a particular management approach.

Further details can be found in the Huon Valley Weed Management Strategy .

Note that the main highways and some main roads are managed by State Growth and any reports of weeds on these roads can be forwarded to State Growth directly or via the NRM Unit of the HVC.

Watch List

These weeds are on the watch list as they are required to be eradicated in the Huon Valley by the Weed Management Act 1999 and have been treated in the past, so the aim is to keep them eradicated:

PhotoCommon NameScientific Name
Heather (thumbnail) HeatherCalluna vulgaris
KaramuCoprosma robusta
Thornapple or DaturaDatura spp.
HorsetailEquisetum sp.
African lovegrassEragrostis curvula
African boxthornLycium ferocissimum
HorehoundMarrubium vulgare
ParrotfeatherMyriophyllum aquaticum
Darwins barberryBerberis darwinii
White-edged nightshadeSolanum marginatum

Priority 1 weeds

These weeds are a priority 1 as they are required to be eradicated in the Huon Valley by the Weed Management Act 1999 and are not considered to be widespread, so the aim is that they are promptly eradicated:

PhotoCommon NameScientific Name
Bridal creeperAsparagus asparagoides
Patersons curseEchium plantagineum
Perforated St Johns wortHypericum perforatum
Square-stemmed St Johns wortHypericum tetrapterum
African feathergrassPennisetum macrourum
Creeping yellowcressRorippa sylvestris

Priority 2 weeds

These weeds are a priority 2 as they are required to be eradicated in the Huon Valley by the Weed Management Act 1999 and are considered to be widespread, so the aim is to reduce the amount of these weeds and eventually eradicate:

PhotoCommon NameScientific Name
New zealand sedgeCarex flagellifera
Pampas grassCortaderia spp.
Seeding willow species (white willow, grey willow, basket willow, purple osier)Salix alba, S. cinerea, S. Xrubens, S. purpurea

Priority 3 weeds

These weeds are a priority 3 as they are required to be contained in the Huon Valley by the Weed Management Act 1999 and are not considered to be widespread, so the aim is to contain these weeds to avoid them becoming widespread:

PhotoCommon NameScientific Name
BoneseedChrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera
Elisha’s tearsLeycesteria formosa
RagwortSenecio jacobaea

Priority 4 weeds

These weeds are a priority 4 as they are required to be contained in the Huon Valley by the Weed Management Act 1999 and are considered to be widespread, so the aim is to ensure these weeds are contained:

PhotoCommon NameScientific Name
FennelFoeniculum vulgare
Slender thistlesCarduus spp.
Creeping or Californian thistleCirsium arvense
English broomCytisus scoparius
Spanish heathErica lusitanica
Canary or Montpellier broomGenista monspessulana
BlackberryRubus fruticosus aggregate
Crack willowSalix fragilis
GorseUlex europaeus